Social Media

Facebook: A week in review

An aggregate of Facebook posts made by our members in the past week can be found below. Latest posts are at the top:

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GraffitiBMXCop
Toronto Police Aboriginal Peacekeeping cops Constable Monica Rutledge (left) and now retired Constable Kim Turner in front of their office at 40 College St #Toronto on the occasion of Kim receiving her retirement wallet badge April 17, 2015



1 day ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
#BeADonor #1Saves8 BeADonor.ca #ontario #canada



1 day ago

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TPS41
Joint Task Force Cleans Up Warden Woods!

On Thursday April 16th, the kids, 41 Division, The City Crisis Response Program, UrbanPromise Toronto, Toronto Community Housing Community Safety Unit, Resident Community Services and Operating Unit I staff did a sweep of the Warden Woods Community.
Armed with only gloves and bags they hunted high and low for garbage of all shapes and sizes.
Success came in bags of white, blue and green that we bundled up and left at the curb for pick up.
The sun graced us with its presence. It was great to hear the laugher and chatter of the force .
Thw hard work was rewarded with piping hot pizza and shwarmas.

A great time was had by all!



2 days ago

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TPS22
22 Division: Crime stats from April 09 - 15, 2015

Break & Enters
- Total 8
- 4 houses
- 3 apartments
- 1 commercial
- 1 arrest

Robberies
- Total 1
- 1 outside
- 2 arrests

Theft of Vehicles
- Total 9
- 4 from residential driveways
- 5 parking lot/streets

Theft from Vehicles
- Total 20
- 16 from residential driveways
- 4 from parking lots/streets

Assaults
- Total 8
- 4 apartment
- 3 commercial
- 1 outside
- 1 arrest

Disclaimer: Valid at the time it was produced. Some of these stats are subject to change.



2 days ago

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torontopolice911
Interested in a career as a Communications Operator? Toronto Police has a job posting you may be interested in. ss


bit.ly
webapp1.torontopolice.on.ca
2 days ago

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torontopolice911
This has been a great #TelecommunicatorsWeek,. I would like to say thank you to Mayor John Tory for proclaiming April 13-17, 2015 9-1-1 Telecommuinicators Week in the City of Toronto, this is a first for our city, and hopefully not the last! Secondly, thanks again to Kevin Frankish for hosting our Communicator of the Year Awards on Tuesday April 14, 2015, they were a great success. I would also like to thank each and every one of you that visits our page and respect the work that our women an men do every day!

To our Toronto Police Communications Operators, our Emergency Services Partners and our colleagues around the globe, keep doing what you do and Thank you!^tf



2 days ago

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TPS12Div
Know any students interested?



2 days ago

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TPS55
Just one more post regarding Clean Up Day...
-The whole concept of the day works well with my 2015 Crime Prevention resolutions & the TPS priorities; physical disorder & safe neighbourhoods. Don't just think litter, consider areas that are conducive to the "unwanted behaviours" in your neighbourhood.
-Check for lighting and its quality ( A light might work but does not illuminate a walking path etc) Between, you, me, MMM, we will get the lighting improved.
-Great opportunity to speak to area residents about hosting events/activities.
-Remember this; no area is conducive to "unwanted behaviour" if their is a park full of families.
3 days ago

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TPS43Div
Some of us were discussing this and we thought we'd pose the question to the public. Thank you for your feedback!
@PCArsenault

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/p100x100/11150937_527555137382233_8709703175256050293_n.jpg?oh=59ab37a6288c14421e1184c435a86601&oe=559C7A2F&__gda__=1441108511_17c2cf6645ffb58484cca987c8fed6cf

Randall Arsenault

Question - what hat would you prefer to see Officers wear while on general patrol? Or does it even matter? What about no hat?
3 days ago

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torontopolice911
A DISPATCHERS PRAYER

Dear Lord,
Help me keep safe those who depend on me.
Give me healthy ears, for they are my link with those who need me.
Keep my mind sharp and alert, my fingers quick and nimble.
Grant that I never forget how to do ten things at once, and do them all equally well.
Bless me with patience Lord.
Patience to deal with the public, with the officers, with the boss, and with everyone else who make me want to grit my teeth and yell.
Give me nerves of steele,
That I may listen to a mother screaming for her child to live,
The man with a gun, or an officer yelling for backup, and not give way to panic.
Grant me empathy
That I may help the battered wife, the rape victim, the abused child,
And not cause them more pain than they already have.
God, give me the ability
To learn what I need, to remember it quickly,
And give me the wisdom to use the knowledge properly.
Bless my family Lord,
For they will have to make sacrifices to shift work, overtime,
Cancelled plans and times when I just canīt take on one more thing.
Help them understand the missed ball games, school programs and dinners for tow.
Lord, give me courage.
The courage to persevere when I feel undervalued,
Unappreciated, overworked and unrecognized,
Courage to keep trying when I feel in my heart itīs hopeless.
Last of all Lord, help me to never forget why I chose this job in the first place,
To never lose sight of what is important in the midst of stress.
Help me to remember that I make a difference,
However small it may seem some days, and that I matter.
I am a dispatcher, Lord, grant me peace.

The author of this poem is now deceased - it was her choice to remain Anonymous. ^tf
3 days ago

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ValueDiversity
The One Move You Can Make to Overpower Bad Body Image | Psychology Today https://t.co/CsfHBF1522 ^dr
3 days ago

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PCGuyServiceTorontoPolice43D
My followers are in Canada(80%), USA(12%)... Get your map too: http://t.co/qgX3k5fDnp http://t.co/lnqcOFckfI


YYZGuy90 (@YYZGuy90) posted a photo on Twitter
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Get the whole picture - and other photos from YYZGuy90
3 days ago

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TPS43Div
Way to go Brad Berezowski!


Timeline Photos
Walk of Fame - April 2015Auxiliary Sergeant Brad Berezowski is our Walk of Fame recipient for April. Brad came to 43 Division in November 2013 as a new recruit. Since then, Brad has developed as a leader and a mentor to younger officers and is even looked up to by our senior officers. Brad also wears many hats in the Auxiliary program. He is the drill instructor for all new recruits and the parade commander for many of our ceremonial events such as the Canadian Police and Peace Officers Memorial Service in Ottawa.Brad is also an training officer and teaches Auxiliary Officers at the Toronto Police College. He developed a training module for new recruits on dress and deportment and since than he has created many other training opportunities from officer safety to scenario based training. Because of Brad's initiative to create and deliver new training opportunities, he was appointed as a Training Officer and was one of the first Auxiliary Officers that was issued the "T" epaulette to signify his role as a trainer.Recently, Brad has created a new initiative at 43 Division to build and strengthen relationships with our community partners and local stakeholders. Brads most recent achievement was his promotion to Sergeant in February this year. In 2014, Brad contributed 1500+ selfless volunteer hours and has already given 300+ hours in 2015. Because of Brad's commitment to the community and the Toronto Police Service, he has been chosen to be our April recipient. Congratulation!!
3 days ago

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TPS41
If you're in the Warden Avenue and St. Clair Avenue East area tomorrow, April 16th, join us for a Community Clean-up from 4pm - 6pm at 52 Cataraqui Crescent.



4 days ago

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TAVISTPS
Let's work together for our most successful year yet. Please help us to support this great cause!

https://fbcdn-profile-a.akamaihd.net/hprofile-ak-xta1/v/t1.0-1/p50x50/1381778_1477593765852748_7439233503770133870_n.jpg?oh=731f8d07d274f69d859fad20978f431e&oe=55AF5181&__gda__=1437554544_fe1a4d3c96158b2c7b6bc0e47afc090c

Stephanie Thoms
https://apps.facebook.com/fundraising_na/PersonalPage.aspx?RegistrationID=2830381
Please help me in supporting a great cause! Let's all work together to make this years Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics Ontario the most successful yet!
4 days ago

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TPS53
*** COME JOIN US AT OUR 53 DIVISION'S ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE ON MAY 2nd, 2015 between 11AM to 4pm ***

There will be:

oBBQ, Snacks & Drinks
oVarious TPS Units including: Mounted, Marine, Police Dogs, ETF
oVintage Police Car Display, Court Services, Tour of 53 Station

53 Division
75 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto
Toronto Police Service



4 days ago

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torontopolice911
IF ONLY YOU COULD
Dispatcher Poem

If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; you would weep like me.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; you would spend countless hours in your bed staring at the ceiling.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; then you would cry for the woman who is losing her husband of decades.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; you would know that gunfire is always near.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; that house fire would not be so spectacular.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; that lost child would be like one of your own.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; that traffic stop would not be so routine.
If your eyes could see what my ears have heard; you would understand.
Author - Unknown.^tf
4 days ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
Great hospitality in #Alexandria, #Virginia from Deputy Police Cief Eddie Reyes
#SMILEcon



4 days ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
Everyone needs a ferris wheel in their town! Love @nationalharbor #FortWashington



4 days ago

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torontopolice911
Congratulations once again to Communicators of the year - Sandra Humenik (Toronto Paramedic Services), Tyler McKay (Toronto Fire Services), and Katie Tinkler (Toronto Police Service).

Thank you to Chief Raftis (Toronto Paramedic Services), Deputy Chief Darryl Reid (Toronto Fire Services) and Chief Blair for taking time out of your very busy days to honour our Communicators.

We thank all of the Senior Officers, family, friends and colleagues who took time out of your day in support. Thanks also to Toronto Police Service, Video Services Unit - Martin Blake for the excellent job on our Tri-Service Communicator of the Year video, and finally a special thanks to Kevin Frankish from City TV's Breakfast television, for a great job as Emcee.


15th Annual Communicator of the Year Awards

5 days ago

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TorontoPolice
"Officer Barnes was the only one who believed in me and my son," recalled the mother. "He became a role model for Kurtis and other young people in the community who werenīt on the right path."


TPSNews.ca | Stories | Public Hero Award For Role Model
tpsnews.ca
Public Hero Award For Role Model By Ron Fanfair, Toronto Police Service Published: 11:21 a.m. April 14, 2015 Updated: 11:22 a.m. April 14, 2015 Had it not been for Constable Crispin Barnesī timely intervention, Kurtis Crane would be dead or in prison. Constable Crispin Barnes was the recipient of an...
5 days ago

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torontopolice911
We honour the Communicators of the Year for Toronto Fire, Paramedic and Police Services


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards
We honour the Communicators of the Year for Toronto Fire, Paramedic and Police Services
5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Toronto Paramedic Services Chief Paul Raftis presenting the Communicator of the Year Award to Sandra Humenik


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Toronto Fire Services Deputy Chief Darryl Reid presenting the TFS Communicator of the Year Award to Tyler McKay


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Kevin Frankish addressing the group. Emergency Services Communicators are #Unsungheroes


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Tracy Finn (@TPS_911ENP thanking Kevin Frankish (@KevinFrankish) for performing MC detail.


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Communicators of the Year TFS - Tyler McKay, Toronto Paramedics - Sandra Humenik and TPS - Katie Tinkler, along with Jr. Communicator of the Year Gelila Aedmasu


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Proud Chiefs and their Communicators of the Year


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Chief Blair: - "Gelila, do you like a group called 'One Direction'"
Gelila: *huge smile* "yes"

Along with Chief Blair Communications Operator Michelle Everest presents Gelila with 2 tickets to see One Direction, along with her Communicator Award


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Toronto Police Chief Blair addressing TPS Communicator of the Year - Katie Tinkler


15th Annual Communicator of the Year AWards

5 days ago

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TPS12Div
Last night the Toronto Police Service honoured some of its volunteers at the Toronto Police College. We had 2 honourees of whom received Awards of Service.

Bernadine Camacho 5 years of service and
Rose Helmy 15 years of service.



5 days ago

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TPS43Div
Have you heard of the Cops For Cancer initiative? Here's a great story, way to come together Toronto! Thank you, we're almost there.


TPSNews.ca | Stories | Record-breaking numbers raised for cancer cure
tpsnews.ca
Record-breaking numbers raised for cancer cure By Sara Faruqi, Toronto Police Service Published: 12:51 p.m. April 13, 2015 Updated: 12:55 p.m. April 13, 2015 Amy Davey of Sex Crimes has always described her mother, Judy, as her favourite person. "Bubbly, outgoing and busy," is how people in Amyīs ho...
5 days ago

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TPS43Div
Great video on how quickly one can be a victim of a destraction theft. Notice just the ipad was taken, not the whole shopping bag? Same thing goes with a wallet, thieves will take a single credit card and return the wallet giving them more time to access the funds.


WARNING: Man gets iPad stolen at fastfood

Man gets iPad stolen at fastfood. Others distract him as accomplice reaches into his bags. BE CAREFUL! Please share! ~ When In Manila
5 days ago

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TPS55
55 Division's "Prom Dress 911"
If you are in need of a prom dress and don't have the means to purchase one come see us.

Eastview Community Centre, 86 Blake St.
-April 26th 1pm - 4pm
-April 27th 3pm - 7pm
Find a dress & take it home!!
Students must bring their student cards.



5 days ago

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TPS41
If you're driving through 41 Division this week, drive extra careful in School Zones!
All officers from 41 Division will pay particular attention to those motorists and cyclists who commit offences in the vicinity of school zones.
http://torontopolice.on.ca/newsreleases/31533



5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Beautiful Tribute.

https://fbcdn-profile-a.akamaihd.net/hprofile-ak-xfa1/v/t1.0-1/c67.18.221.221/s100x100/386433_139863626122825_7812587_n.jpg?oh=5c320573aece3180cf649bd2e275194f&oe=55E50F98&__gda__=1436878804_93c51927c40eb83014a7c02fd35bd50f

Communications Services - Toronto Police Service

A Tribute to Dispatchers Someone once asked me if I thought that answering telephones for a living was a profession. I said, "I thought it was a calling."And so is dispatching. I have found in my law enforcement career that dispatchers are the unsung heroes of public safety. They miss the excitement of riding in a speeding car with lights flashing and sirens wailing. They can only hear of the bright orange flames leaping from a burning building. They do not get to see the joy on the face of worried parents as they see their child begin breathing on its own, after it has been given CPR.Dispatchers sit in darkened rooms looking at computer screens and talking to voices from faces they never see. It's like reading a lot of books, but only half of each one.Dispatchers connect the anxious conversations of terrified victims, angry informants, suicidal citizens and grouchy officers. They are the calming influence of all of them-the quiet, competent voices in the night that provide the pillars for the bridges of sanity and safety. They are expected to gather information from highly agitated people who can't remember where they live, what their name is, or what they just saw. And then, they are to calmly provide all that information to the officers, firefighters, or paramedics without error the first time and every time.Dispatchers are expected to be able to do five things at once-and do them well. While questioning a frantic caller, they must type the information into a computer, tip off another dispatcher, put another caller on hold, and listen to an officer run a plate for a parking problem. To miss the plate numbers is to raise the officer's ire; to miss the caller's information may be to endanger the same officer's life. But, the officer will never understand that.Dispatchers have two constant companions, other dispatchers and stress. They depend on one, and try to ignore the other. They are chastened by upset callers, taken for granted by the public, and criticized by the officers. The rewards they get are inexpensive and infrequent, except for the satisfaction they feel at the end of a shift, having done what they were expected to do.Dispatchers come in all shapes and sizes, all races, both sexes, and all ages. They are blondes, and brunettes, and redheads. They are quiet and outgoing, single, or married, plain, beautiful, or handsome. No two are alike, yet they are all the same.They are people who were selected in a difficult hiring process to do an impossible job. They are as different as snowflakes, but they have one thing in common. They care about people and they enjoy being the lifeline of society-that steady voice in a storm-the one who knows how to handle every emergency and does it with style and grace; and, uncompromised competence.Dispatchers play many roles: therapist, doctor, lawyer, teacher, weatherman, guidance counselor, psychologist, priest, secretary, supervisor, politician, and reporter. And few people must jump through the emotional hoops on the trip through the joy of one caller's birthday party, to the fear of another caller's burglary in progress, to the anger of a neighbor blocked in their drive, and back to the birthday caller all in a two-minute time frame. The emotional rollercoaster rolls to a stop after an 8 or 10 hour shift, and they are expected to walk down to their car with steady feet and no queasiness in their stomach-because they are dispatchers. If they hold it in, they are too closed. If they talk about it, they are a whiner. If it bothers them, it adds more stress. If it doesn't, they question themselves, wondering why.Dispatchers are expected to have:othe compassion of Mother Theresaothe wisdom of Solomonothe interviewing skills of Oprah Winfrey othe gentleness of Florence Nightingale othe patience of Job othe voice of Barbara Streisand othe knowledge of Einstein othe answers of Ann Landers othe humor of David Letterman othe investigative skills of Sgt. Joe Friday othe looks of Melanie Griffith or Don Johnson othe faith of Billy Graham othe energy of Charo oand the endurance of the Energizer BunnyIs it any wonder that many drop out during training? It is a unique and talented person who can do this job and do it well. And, it is fitting and proper that we take a few minutes or hours this week to honor you for the job that each of you do. That recognition is overdue and it is insufficient. But, it is sincere.I have tried to do your job, and I have failed. It takes a special person with unique skills. I admire you and I thank you for the thankless job you do. You are heroes, and I am proud to work with you.[This piece was written by Chief Wagoner in 1994 in connection with National Telecommunicator Week. He has graciously gives others permission to use it for non-commercial purposes.]^tf
5 days ago

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torontopolice911
Congrats to all of our Award Recipients! tf


Toronto Emergency Services Communicator of the Year 2015

Toronto Emergency Services Communicator of the Year 2015 [9:50] April 13-17 will be proclaimed by the City of Toronto as 9-1-1 Telecommunicatorīs Week. Every...
5 days ago

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torontopolice911
A Tribute to Dispatchers

Someone once asked me if I thought that answering telephones for a living was a profession. I said, "I thought it was a calling."

And so is dispatching. I have found in my law enforcement career that dispatchers are the unsung heroes of public safety. They miss the excitement of riding in a speeding car with lights flashing and sirens wailing. They can only hear of the bright orange flames leaping from a burning building. They do not get to see the joy on the face of worried parents as they see their child begin breathing on its own, after it has been given CPR.

Dispatchers sit in darkened rooms looking at computer screens and talking to voices from faces they never see. It's like reading a lot of books, but only half of each one.

Dispatchers connect the anxious conversations of terrified victims, angry informants, suicidal citizens and grouchy officers. They are the calming influence of all of them-the quiet, competent voices in the night that provide the pillars for the bridges of sanity and safety. They are expected to gather information from highly agitated people who can't remember where they live, what their name is, or what they just saw. And then, they are to calmly provide all that information to the officers, firefighters, or paramedics without error the first time and every time.

Dispatchers are expected to be able to do five things at once-and do them well. While questioning a frantic caller, they must type the information into a computer, tip off another dispatcher, put another caller on hold, and listen to an officer run a plate for a parking problem. To miss the plate numbers is to raise the officer's ire; to miss the caller's information may be to endanger the same officer's life. But, the officer will never understand that.

Dispatchers have two constant companions, other dispatchers and stress. They depend on one, and try to ignore the other. They are chastened by upset callers, taken for granted by the public, and criticized by the officers. The rewards they get are inexpensive and infrequent, except for the satisfaction they feel at the end of a shift, having done what they were expected to do.

Dispatchers come in all shapes and sizes, all races, both sexes, and all ages. They are blondes, and brunettes, and redheads. They are quiet and outgoing, single, or married, plain, beautiful, or handsome. No two are alike, yet they are all the same.
They are people who were selected in a difficult hiring process to do an impossible job. They are as different as snowflakes, but they have one thing in common. They care about people and they enjoy being the lifeline of society-that steady voice in a storm-the one who knows how to handle every emergency and does it with style and grace; and, uncompromised competence.

Dispatchers play many roles: therapist, doctor, lawyer, teacher, weatherman, guidance counselor, psychologist, priest, secretary, supervisor, politician, and reporter. And few people must jump through the emotional hoops on the trip through the joy of one caller's birthday party, to the fear of another caller's burglary in progress, to the anger of a neighbor blocked in their drive, and back to the birthday caller all in a two-minute time frame. The emotional rollercoaster rolls to a stop after an 8 or 10 hour shift, and they are expected to walk down to their car with steady feet and no queasiness in their stomach-because they are dispatchers. If they hold it in, they are too closed. If they talk about it, they are a whiner. If it bothers them, it adds more stress. If it doesn't, they question themselves, wondering why.

Dispatchers are expected to have:
othe compassion of Mother Theresaothe wisdom of Solomonothe interviewing skills of Oprah Winfrey othe gentleness of Florence Nightingale othe patience of Job othe voice of Barbara Streisand othe knowledge of Einstein othe answers of Ann Landers othe humor of David Letterman othe investigative skills of Sgt. Joe Friday othe looks of Melanie Griffith or Don Johnson othe faith of Billy Graham othe energy of Charo oand the endurance of the Energizer Bunny

Is it any wonder that many drop out during training? It is a unique and talented person who can do this job and do it well. And, it is fitting and proper that we take a few minutes or hours this week to honor you for the job that each of you do. That recognition is overdue and it is insufficient. But, it is sincere.

I have tried to do your job, and I have failed. It takes a special person with unique skills. I admire you and I thank you for the thankless job you do. You are heroes, and I am proud to work with you.

[This piece was written by Chief Wagoner in 1994 in connection with National Telecommunicator Week. He has graciously gives others permission to use it for non-commercial purposes.]

^tf
5 days ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
Visiting Squeezie HQ ;) #SMILEcon



5 days ago

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TorontoPolice
Detective Constable Amy Davey has raised almost $14,000 for Cops for Cancer for the Canadian Cancer Society.


TPSNews.ca | Stories | Record-breaking numbers raised for cancer cure
tpsnews.ca
Record-breaking numbers raised for cancer cure By Sara Faruqi, Toronto Police Service Published: 12:51 p.m. April 13, 2015 Updated: 12:55 p.m. April 13, 2015 Amy Davey of Sex Crimes has always described her mother, Judy, as her favourite person. "Bubbly, outgoing and busy," is how people in Amyīs ho...
5 days ago

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TPS53
Our 53 Division Crime Prevention Officers Alex Li & Tim Somers at Forest Hill Collegiate for Career Day. Presentation & Interaction with local students & future leaders!! Positive connection with youth & Police. Great work guys!!!



6 days ago

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TPS41
Missing from 41 Division.
Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-4100, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477), online at www.222tips.com, text TOR and your message to CRIMES (274637).
http://torontopolice.on.ca/newsreleases/31541



6 days ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
Safe arrival. Beautiful day in #Washington #DC #USA #Virginia



6 days ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
Flew on this #Dash8 turbo prop this morning #Toronto to #Washington. Caught this pic while boarding with thec#CNTower in background :)



6 days ago

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torontopolice911
It's Telecommunicators Week - April 13 - 17, 2015 and I would just like to take a moment to thank all of the men & women who "answer the call" on 9-1-1. Thank you for doing what you do so well, day in and day out. ^tf
6 days ago

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torontopolice911
AND GOD CREATED DISPATCHERS

The angel walked in and found the Lord walking around in a small circle and muttering to herself. "What are you working on now Lord?" he asked.

"Well I finished creating a peace officer, now Iīm working on a dispatcher." Since the angel could see nothing in the room, he asked God to tell him about it.

"Itīs somewhat like the police officer model, but it has 5 hands; one for answering the phone, two for typing, one for answering the radio, and one for grabbing a cup of coffee. The arms had to be placed fairly carefully since all the dispatcherīs tasks have to be done simultaneously.

The digestive system is a little complicated since it runs on coffee and food that can be delivered, but seldom needs to get up for the rest room.

I made the skin out of tempered duralite covered with Teflon. A dispatcherīs hide has to be tough enough to withstand darts from cranky officers, jabs from citizens and the lack of attention by the administrations, but not show any signs of wear and tear.

A dispatcher only needs one pair of eyes; that left extra room for the ears. There are five sets of ears, one set for the telephone, one for the main radio, two for the other radios it has to monitor, and one to hear everything else going on around it. They fit all right on the head since it had to be extra large for the brain, anyway. The brain has to be enormous so it can remember a full set of 10 codes, phonetic alphabet, at least two hundred different voices, the entire contents of three SOP Manuals, two Teletype manuals, and an NCIC code book. Of course I left enough extra space for it to learn the individual quirks of every different Sergeant, Lieutenant, Shift Commander, Fire Chief and other Supervisors, and the ability to keep them all straight. There also has to be room for it to learn which situations need an officer and which donīt, and also the ability to determine in less than two minutes what to do with any given event. There is a built in condenser so it can take an hour long explanation, put it into 30 seconds worth of radio transmission, but still get the whole story across.

Those switches on the front are for the emotions. It has to be able to talk to a mother whose child has just died - but not feel pain, a rape victim with empathy, a suicidal person with calmness and reassurance, and abusive drunks without getting angry. When one of the officers yells for help, it canīt panic, and when someone doesnīt make it, the dispatcherīs heart mustnīt break. That little soft spot just to the left of the emotions switch is for the abandoned animals, frightened children and little old ladies who are lonely and just want to talk to someone for a few minutes. The dispatcher has to care very much for the officers and firefighters it serves, without getting involved with any of them, so I added another switch for that. Plus of course, the dispatcher canīt have any of its own issues to worry about while it is on duty, so that last switch turns those off. The patience switch is turned up to high all the time on the CTO model, and Iīve added an extra fuse to them to handle the overload.

A dispatcher has to be able to function efficiently under less than good physical conditions, and be flexible enough to withstand whatever whim the administration comes up with, while still retaining its general shape and form. That warm fuzzy is there for officers to use when they gripe, other dispatchers when they hurt, and for those who are shell shocked by a horrible call and just need someone to be there. The voice gave me a little trouble; it has to be clear and easy to understand, calm and even when everyone else is screaming, but still able to convey empathy and caring while remaining totally professional. It runs for a full 12 hours on very little sleep, requires almost no days off and gets paid less than an executive secretary.

"The dispatcher sounds wonderful!" said the angel. "Where is this amazing creation?"

"Well, you see," answered the Supreme Being with a sigh, and paused, "Dispatchers are invisible unless they make a mistake. So itīs impossible to tell when they are run down, worn out or in need of repair. Now that Iīve created them, I canīt see the original model to make enough of them to go around."

-- Author Unknown ^tf
6 days ago

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GraffitiBMXCop
#Sunrise 6:30am April 13 at Billy Bishop Airport just before flight to Washington to see Lauri Stevens #Toronto



6 days ago